Rare baby Zebra born in UK

and lots more!

 

BOWDLEFLODE NEWS 9th Edition – November 2018

Welcome.

With every Bowdleflode News we bring you interesting facts about Bowdleflodeland and also Planet Earth with features about Endangered Species.

NOW FOR SOME VERY GOOD NEWS…

A baby female, Grevy’s Zebra was born at Marwell Zoo on 12th October 2018.

Born to first time mum, Imogen, she is an important addition to the European Endangered Species Breeding Programme (EEP).

In the late 1970s there were 15,000 Grevy’s zebra in the wild. Today there are estimated to be fewer than 2,500 remaining.  And all because of climate change, habitat loss and competition with increasing livestock numbers.

ANOTHER NIGHTMARE STORY and EVERY REASON FOR US TO SERIOUSLY SUPPORT ENDANGERED SPECIES

One of the world’s rarest apes faces extinction – THE GRAUER’S GORILLA.

You’ll have heard countless stories of the tragic human cost of war, but what’s often missed from the casualty counts is the staggering amount of animal deaths.  Grauer’s Gorilla has paid the price more than most.

The brutal civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo led to rebels and poachers flooding into protected areas.  The local gorillas didn’t stand a chance, and have died in their thousands.  The numbers are extraordinary. Over just 20 years, 13, 200 were killed. To put that into perspective, four in every five Grauer’s Gorillas fell in just half a generation.

The situation remains extremely volatile and the surviving gorillas are facing a storm of threats including hunting for bushmeat and deadly disease outbreaks and their home is being torn apart by large-scale agricultural expansion, illegal logging and mining.

Now, with their families fragmented and their future on a knife edge, they are at the highest extinction warning level for a wild animal.

The Bowdleflode Project encourages creativity in children with its online fantasy zoo but also aims to concentrate minds on the fate of Endangered Species on Planet Earth.

 

Koalas at Longleat

Longleat has recently teamed up with the Southern Australian Government and Cleland Wildlife Park in order to launch an international breeding and awareness programme for Australia’s most iconic species – the koala!

Six Southern koalas will soon be making the journey from Adelaide to join the Longleat family so that we can act as a European hub for the newly-created International Koala Centre of Excellence (IKCE).

And these adorable new additions won’t be coming alone; a pair of Southern hairy-nosed wombats is making the trip from down under as well. All these marvellous marsupials will be moving into a brand new, purpose built habitat – Koala Creek!  You can’t meet Southern Koalas anywhere else in Europe so, next spring, 2019 why not go to Longleat to visit Koala Creek and have a wonderful day out in Wiltshire?

2018 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Two snub-nosed monkeys are pictured resting on a stone and staring intently into the distance. What are they looking at and what are they thinking?  It turns out they are watching a big barney between members of their troop.

This image of apparent serenity versus commotion is the overall winner of the 2018 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, announced at a gala dinner at London’s Natural History Museum.

The picture was taken by Marsel van Oosten in China’s Qinling Mountains.

The Dutchman had to follow the troop for many days to understand the animals’ dynamics and to learn to predict their behaviour.  His goal was to show, in one shot, the beautiful hair on a male snub-nosed monkey’s back, and the creature’s blue face.

Marsel’s perseverance eventually paid off with this exquisite composition that includes a smaller female behind.

 

THE BOWDLEFLODE NEWS WILL KEEP YOU UPDATED ON MANY DIFFERENT FEATURES CONCERNING ENDANGERED SPECIES