• A habitat is a place where an organism (plant or animal) lives.  Habitats are also places where groups of organisms live.  Habitats are areas that have everything that animals need to survive, this includes water, food, shelter from predators and what they need to nest or breed.  Different plants and animals need different habitats.
  • Woodland provides for a wider variety of species than any other habitat in Britain.  Mature oaks can be the home for over 200 different types of insect.
  • Dozens of species of birds require woodland to survive as a place to find food and bring up their young, making their nests on branches or in tree holes.
  • Woodlands are also a great place for animals to protect themselves from predators, either by climbing up trees, or making use of fallen leaves to make hidden nests.
  • Woodlands are also very important to humans, not only do they provide us with resources, trees also absorb a great deal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere which helps slow down the effects of climate change.
  • Trees also ‘drink’ a lot of water and so play an important role in protecting our towns and cities from flooding.
  • Woodland provides for a wider variety of species than any other habitat in Britain.  Mature oaks can be the home for over 200 different types of insect.
  • Dozens of species of birds require woodland to survive as a place to find food and bring up their young, making their nests on branches or in tree holes.
  • Woodlands are also a great place for animals to protect themselves from predators, either by climbing up trees, or making use of fallen leaves to make hidden nests.
  • Woodlands are also very important to humans, not only do they provide us with resources, trees also absorb a great deal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere which helps slow down the effects of climate change.
  • Trees also ‘drink’ a lot of water and so play an important role in protecting our towns and cities from flooding.
  • Before humans settled the British Isles, Britain was covered in woodland.
  • Over the centuries humans have cut these down to just 5% of the country in the 1950s. That has now been increased to 12% but most of that is tree farms where only one species of tree is grown at a time.
  • Wildlife needs a mix of trees that grow to an old age in order to develop into useful habitats.
  • It also helps if trees are at different stages of growth as it gives animals, plants and fungi opportunities to thrive. This happens far less now as trees are either grown at the same speed in farms or woods are left unmanaged.
  • Diseases, like Dutch Elm Disease and Ash dieback, are destroying trees across the country, whilst climate change is making it hard for some species of tree to grow.
  • Large populations of deer are also a problem as they eat the bark off trees and eat young tree shoots.
  • Before humans settled the British Isles, Britain was covered in woodland.
  • Over the centuries humans have cut these down to just 5% of the country in the 1950s. That has now been increased to 12% but most of that is tree farms where only one species of tree is grown at a time.
  • Wildlife needs a mix of trees that grow to an old age in order to develop into useful habitats.
  • It also helps if trees are at different stages of growth as it gives animals, plants and fungi opportunities to thrive. This happens far less now as trees are either grown at the same speed in farms or woods are left unmanaged.
  • Diseases, like Dutch Elm Disease and Ash dieback, are destroying trees across the country, whilst climate change is making it hard for some species of tree to grow.
  • Large populations of deer are also a problem as they eat the bark off trees and eat young tree shoots.
  • If your family or school has woodland it is important to manage it correctly. The Wildlife Trust has great information here on what you can do. You can become a member of the Trust and volunteer in various projects that may be happening close to you.
  • You can also make sure that you use as much recycled paper and cardboard as possible as this means that less trees need to be cut down to create new paper. Also make sure that you recycle all of your old paper, separating it from general waste.
  • Or, you can join The Woodland Trust who look after all sorts of woodland around the country.
  • If your family or school has woodland it is important to manage it correctly. The Wildlife Trust has great information here on what you can do. You can become a member of the Trust and volunteer in various projects that may be happening close to you.
  • You can also make sure that you use as much recycled paper and cardboard as possible as this means that less trees need to be cut down to create new paper. Also make sure that you recycle all of your old paper, separating it from general waste.
  • Or, you can join The Woodland Trust who look after all sorts of woodland around the country.