A habitat is a place where an organism ( a plant or an animal) lives.  Habitats are also places where groups of organisms live.  Habitats have everything that animals needs to survive, this includes water, food, shelter from predators and what they need to nest or breed.

The British  Isles has one of the largest coastlines in  Europe and you are  never more than 80 miles from the sea, making it a habitat that is generally accessible to all.

  • There is a wide variety of different coastline in Britain  from beaches of sand and pebbles, to tall,  hard  rock cliffs.
  • The coastline is also changing all the time, either being built up by silt and rock from rivers, or eroded away by the sea.
  • The coastline is an  important habitat for many different sea  birds, such as puffins and  razorbills who nest on cliff edges and spend the rest of their time out at sea, to sanderlings and oystercatchers who come to sandy beaches for their food.
  • Sand dunes are some of the only places that you will see rare British lizards,  like the slow worm and sand lizard, as well as amphibians like the natterjack toad.

The British  Isles has one of the largest coastlines in  Europe and you are  never more than 80 miles from the sea, making it a habitat that is generally accessible to all.

  • There is a wide variety of different coastline in Britain  from beaches of sand and pebbles, to tall,  hard  rock cliffs.
  • The coastline is also changing all the time, either being built up by silt and rock from rivers, or eroded away by the sea.
  • The coastline is an  important habitat for many different sea  birds, such as puffins and  razorbills who nest on cliff edges and spend the rest of their time out at sea, to sanderlings and oystercatchers who come to sandy beaches for their food.
  • Sand dunes are some of the only places that you will see rare British lizards,  like the slow worm and sand lizard, as well as amphibians like the natterjack toad.

Climate change  is having a big effect on the coastline, making it harder for native species of plants and animals to survive as they are used to a colder climate.

  • Climate change is having a big effect on the coastline, making it harder for native species of plants and animals to survive as they are used to a colder climate
  • Raising sea  levels speed  up the erosion of the coast, due to more powerful storms and flooding.  To combat this, 45% of the British coastline is protected  by flood defences, but these human-made constructions disrupt wildlife,  making it hard for certain animals to access the sea.
  • Visitors and tourists enjoying the beautiful coastline have an effect.  Walkers can disturb nesting birds and scare off animals from areas that they need to find  food and shelter.
  • Overfishing in the seas around  Britain  has reduced the amount of food available to seabirds making it harder for them to survive, whilst plastic pollution clogs up the seas and  beaches taking anything up to 1,000 years to decompose.

 

  • Wild animals need to be left undisturbed to bring up their young during the Spring and Summer.   If they feel there’ s danger, they may not be able to collect food, or even feel they have to abandon their young.
  • Make sure to keep to paths when walking and not to move large rocks or bits of wood around.
  • When visiting beaches, take some time to collect any rubbish that has been washed up by the sea and make sure to clean up after yourself.
  • Support charities that campaign for the reintroduction of saltmarshes and mudflats, not only do these support a great deal of wildlife, but they also protect human settlements from flooding.
  • Wild animals need to be left undisturbed to bring up their young during the Spring and Summer.   If they feel there’ s danger, they may not be able to collect food, or even feel they have to abandon their young.
  • Make sure to keep to paths when walking and not to move large rocks or bits of wood around.
  • When visiting beaches, take some time to collect any rubbish that has been washed up by the sea and make sure to clean up after yourself.
  • Support charities that campaign for the reintroduction of saltmarshes and mudflats, not only do these support a great deal of wildlife, but they also protect human settlements from flooding.