• Butterflies and moths have seen a big drop in numbers over the last sixty years.  One of the largest drop in numbers is the small tortoiseshell butterfly. Since 2003, 77% of its population has disappeared.  This once common sight in British gardens is becoming harder to see.
  • Many insect populations have had a hard time due to climate change, which has seen British springs and summers become more wet. Farmers and gardeners have cleared lots of hedgerows that often had nectar-rich wild flowers growing near them, as well as nettles for caterpillars to feed off.

Grassland, farmland, coastal fringes, hedgerows, woodlands, towns and gardens.

Grassland, farmland, coastal fringes, hedgerows, woodlands, towns and gardens.

  • Many species of butterfly love buddleia and other nectar-rich wild flowers. They also need green shrubs to lay their eggs on, so that they can survive over the winter. It is also a good idea to have a wild, untended part of your grounds or garden to let plants like nettles grow as this is what small tortoiseshell caterpillars feed on.
  • Many species of butterfly love buddleia and other nectar-rich wild flowers. They also need green shrubs to lay their eggs on, so that they can survive over the winter. It is also a good idea to have a wild, untended part of your grounds or garden to let plants like nettles grow as this is what small tortoiseshell caterpillars feed on.