• This hugely popular creature has seen its numbers decline greatly since the middle of the 20th Century. In the UK they have gone from over 30 million to just one million now.
  • Climate change has probably had a big effect, creating warmer winters.  This leads to hedgehogs waking too early from hibernation when there isn’t enough food available.  Hedgehogs are also finding that their habitats are being destroyed by new roads and homes.

Woodland, farmland, hedgerows, towns and gardens.

Woodland, farmland, hedgerows, towns and gardens.

  • Feeding – Use a plain, meat-based cat food, or a specialist hedgehog food (sold in garden centres).  The specialist food helps to keep their teeth sharp and clean. If you have a problem with cats or dogs eating the food, try placing the food under a brick shelter with a hedgehog-sized gap in it.
  • Link your garden with properties next to yours. Cut small holes in fences that allow hedgehogs to move from one garden to the next. Talk to your neighbours to try and encourage them to do the same.
  • Build or buy a hedgehog home – we have plans from Hedgehog Street which we can send you.
  • Build a log pile – a large log pile in a quiet corner of your garden gives hedgehogs a place to find lots of food and to hibernate in the winter.
  • Compost heaps – open air compost heaps attract many insects that hedgehogs eat and can be a place for hedgehogs to nest in.
  • Leaf piles – hedgehogs love hibernating in these piles and also use the leaves to make beds for nesting.
  • Wild corner – have a section of your grounds or garden that is largely untended with as many wildflowers as possible. Let it grow as it wants and do not use any fertilisers. This helps insect populations which the hedgehog feeds on.
  • Ponds – these give hedgehogs a source of water that they need to survive. It also produces amphibians and insects that hedgehogs feed on. Make sure there is a gentle incline to the pond so that the hedgehog can easily get in and out.
  • Feeding – Use a plain, meat-based cat food, or a specialist hedgehog food (sold in garden centres).  The specialist food helps to keep their teeth sharp and clean. If you have a problem with cats or dogs eating the food, try placing the food under a brick shelter with a hedgehog-sized gap in it.
  • Link your garden with properties next to yours. Cut small holes in fences that allow hedgehogs to move from one garden to the next. Talk to your neighbours to try and encourage them to do the same.
  • Build or buy a hedgehog home – we have plans from Hedgehog Street which we can send you.
  • Build a log pile – a large log pile in a quiet corner of your garden gives hedgehogs a place to find lots of food and to hibernate in the winter.
  • Compost heaps – open air compost heaps attract many insects that hedgehogs eat and can be a place for hedgehogs to nest in.
  • Leaf piles – hedgehogs love hibernating in these piles and also use the leaves to make beds for nesting.
  • Wild corner – have a section of your grounds or garden that is largely untended with as many wildflowers as possible. Let it grow as it wants and do not use any fertilisers. This helps insect populations which the hedgehog feeds on.
  • Ponds – these give hedgehogs a source of water that they need to survive. It also produces amphibians and insects that hedgehogs feed on. Make sure there is a gentle incline to the pond so that the hedgehog can easily get in and out.