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Bowdleflodes in Africa!

Bowdleflode News No. 45 – February 2022
Baby rhino following its mother through the bush with it nose millimetres from her back leg.

The very first African Bowdleflodes

The Bowdleflodes have already made a splash in corners of the globe such as Croatia and Australia, with children sending drawings and descriptions of their creative creatures for the website and for the Instagram Wildlife Park Gallery (@bowdleflodesafari).  Now we are excited to share that for the first time we have received drawings from primary school children in Africa!

Greta Rowe Primary School is run by a wonderfully organised family, James and Jane Moile Lempaso and their team.

The school nestles under the lea of Mt Kenya, which is right on the equator, in Naramoru near Nanyuki. Many years ago Bowdleflode founder, Neil Lawson Baker, first visited this area in Kenya and saw snow at the top of a mountain on the equator.  Amazed by such a sight he really thought the hot tropical sun would melt it!

The school has been established since 2011, and James and Jane’s aim is to get as many children as possible to their school, providing a holistic environment to encourage their personal growth and education.

Helping to educate children is at the heart of The Bowdleflode Project and the many glowing testimonials which can be seen on our website from teachers of schools that take part and from parents and supporters is really quite wonderful.

The BOWDLEFLODE BOOKS are now also coming on stream on Amazon and Waterstones and other platforms and are adding to the word being spread worldwide.

Any support you can give is hugely appreciated and e-introductions to teachers and schools are like gold dust for us so please feel free to help wherever you can.

Thank you!

James Moile in the classroom

Jane and James Moile

Help for African Primary School Children

Last year Bowdleflodes were able to raise enough funds to help Greta Rowe install a fresh water supply, where they previously had none.  It was a life changer for the school and children.  This year we hope to help further by raising money for a school van which could transport the children, enabling them to attend school daily, without taking unnecessary travel risks.  If any of our faithful readers would like to help please contact Neil personally by e-mail.

Helping to educate children is at the heart of The Bowdleflode Project and the many glowing testimonials which can be seen on our website from teachers of schools that take part and from parents and supporters is really quite wonderful.

The BOWDLEFLODE BOOKS are now also coming on stream on Amazon and Waterstones and other platforms and are adding to the word being spread worldwide.

Any support you can give is hugely appreciated and e-introductions to teachers or schools are like gold dust for us so please feel free to help wherever you can.

Thank you!

Ghostly monkey among 224 new Mekong region species

It sometimes seems hard to believe that there is even one species out there that we don’t already know about, but a monkey with ghostly features is among 224 new species listed in the World Wildlife Fund’s latest update on the greater Mekong region.

The conservation group’s report, highlights the need to protect the rich biodiversity and habitats in the region, which includes Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Myanmar.

The monkey is called the Popa langur, inhabiting the steep hillsides of the extinct Mt. Popa volcano in Myanmar. With distinct ghostly white circles around its eyes, it was the only new mammal on the list. Dozens of newly identified reptiles, frogs and newts, fish and 155 plant species, including the only known succulent bamboo species, found in Laos, were also listed. More than 3000 new species have ben identified in the biodiversity hotspot since 1997.

Scientists use measurements and samples from museum collections to compare and identify key differences with features of the newly discovered animals and plants. Studying such differences can help determine the range of species and threats to their survival, though identification can be a tricky process. A variety of methods have to be used and some species are found in more than one country. 

The Popa langur was identified based on genetic matching of recently gathered bones with specimens from Britain’s Natural History Museum collected more than a century ago. Two main distinctive characteristics were the broad white rings around its eyes and its front-pointing whiskers. The monkey is a candidate to be listed as a critically endangered species on the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, since only 200-250 are thought to survive in the wild, in a handful of places.

‘Green corridor’ to link Bath with countryside

The City of Bath from the air

Plans for a “green corridor” will soon link Bath’s historic city to the surrounding countryside.  The National Trust says the corridor will connect the World Heritage Site with the area around it via Bathampton Meadows, meaning the some 40 hectares site is protected from future development.

Connecting the green spaces will improve access to nature for those living in the urban part of the city, delivering many health and wellbeing benefits to residents as well as the huge number of visitors who come every year.  The corridor will also allow animals and birds to move from one habitat to another.

One of the first of 20 “green corridors” proposed by the trust, the land has already been transferred from Bath and North East Somerset Council.  Proposals include a three-mile route to revive the Georgian trend of walking and enjoying countryside views – something that was prescribed by doctors in the 18th Century.  The Trust hopes the corridor will benefit wildlife, providing foraging habitat for Greater Horseshoe Bats, wetland habitat for wading birds and increased numbers of wildflowers for pollinators.

Bowdleflode of the Month

This month’s Bowdleflode has been created by Victoria from Greta Rowe School, Africa

Meet… MOUNTAIN ZEBRA!

 

 

Victoria describes her creation as:

“Gentle, clever and curious. Mountain Zebra eats grass only and can survive in the desert or rainforest.”

Thank you Victoria for your wonderful creation!  👏 👏⠀

 

The countdown for Christmas is officially on!  And if you’re looking for that perfect gift or stocking filler for those little people in your life then look no further than the Bowdleflode Series of books and Colouring Book.  Transport those little creative minds into the world of Bowdleflodeland with Professor Gett and his team for a fantasy wildlife adventure. Available to order from Amazon or Waterstones!